Back home

Back home

UH logoHouston Science CenterBuilding 593 – (713) 743-8200

TcSUH Events

Home » Events » Events from 2009

Bi-Weekly Seminar

Development of Nanostructured Systems for Energy, Environmental and Biomedical Applications

 Karen  Martirosyan

by: Karen Martirosyan

Date: Friday September 18, 2009

Time: 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Location: Houston Science Center – Building 593 — Room 102

Overview

The main topic of this presentation will focus on development of nanostructured particulate systems and fabrication of advanced devices for power systems, energy storage, environmental protection, national security and health care. I will present novel nanoenergetic systems that have the potential to enable a more concentrated energy release and potentially can be used for various military applications such as an actuation parts, igniter, propulsion unit, gas-generators as well as an active part for high power electromagnetic pulse generators. I will describe a novel cost-effective and energy efficient production of nanostructured complex oxides that we referred to as Carbon Combustion Synthesis of Oxides (CCSO). In this process, the reactive oxidation of carbon/graphite nanoparticles generates a steep thermal wave (temperature gradient of up to 500 °C/cm) that propagates through the solid reactant mixture (oxides, carbonates or nitrates) converting it to the desired products. The high rate of gas release enables synthesis of highly porous complex oxides having a particle size in the range of 50-800 nm. The experimental results of fabrication of various systems such as hard and soft magnetic materials, superconductors, multiferroics, bulk ceramic resistors, capacitors, photocatalysts with p-n junction, MRI contrast agents and cancer hyperthermia will be presented. Key factors that affected to the device characteristics (magnetization, conductivity, magnetic resonance relaxivity and other) will be discussed. Finally, I will describe a novel medical device that we referred to as Encapsulated Contrast Agent Marker (ECAM) for MRI cancer prostate brachytherapy (PB). While MRI is the modern superior imaging modality, for cancer treatment it is currently not used in PB because the implanted radioactive titanium seeds appear artifacts (negative contrast) and cannot be accurately localized within the prostate and periprostatic tissue. The innovative development of an MRI visible ECAMs technology will provide a precise targeted magnetic resonance imaging for PB and can impact over 200,000 in US (12,000 in Texas) men diagnosed annually with localized prostate cancer. Development of this emerging technologies warrant a multifaceted approach, which includes interdisciplinary collaboration, partnerships with industry and academia, and integration of modern problems into our curriculum.

Download: Event PDF

Bi-Weekly Seminar

Ion Implantation, Past, Present, and Future: The Future is in the Area of Material Modification for Biology Research

Prof. Wei-Kan  Chu

by: Prof. Wei-Kan Chu

Date: Friday September 04, 2009

Time: 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Location: Houston Science Center – Building 593 — Room 102

Overview

Ion Implantation is the injection of energetic ions into a solid, thereby changing the physical properties of the solid by impurity doping, and/or by radiation damage. It is mostly used in semiconductor device fabrication and in metal finishing as well as in various applications in materials science research and technology. In this talk, I will briefly review the process of ion implantation, its characteristics, and its applications in material modification. I will give a few examples of our current activities using ion implantation. More importantly, I will be proposing applications related to ion beam modification of soft materials for biological applications. Although ion implantation has been around for more than forty years, biological applications of ion implantation have come of age gradually in the last decade or so. I will be discussing some recent developments in ion implantation modification of polymers and ion beam modification of surface hydrophilicity for applications in protein pattern printing and subsequent living cell adhesion. The intention of this talk is to seek feedback, interaction, and collaboration from the biology, biochemistry, biophysics, and biomedical communities.

Download: Event PDF

Joint Seminar

Confined Metals

Dr. Michael  Ruck

by: Dr. Michael Ruck

Date: Monday August 24, 2009

Time: 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Location: Houston Science Center – Building 593 — Room 102

Overview

Not available.

Download: Event PDF

Bi-Weekly Seminar

Electron Beam Characterization of YBa2Cu3O7-δ

Prof. James K. Meen

by: Prof. James K. Meen

Date: Friday August 21, 2009

Time: 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Location: Houston Science Center – Building 593 — Room 102

Overview

There are significant challenges to characterizing YBa2Cu3O7-δ (Y123) by electron microbeam but the results obtained have considerable utility. Few samples of Y123 have that cation stoichiometry. Variations within individual monoliths are used to map crystallization sequence and it will be shown that this is not necessarily from a single nucleus. Melting relations under different partial pressures of oxygen are employed to show that copper is in mixed valence state in Y-Ba-Cu oxide liquids even in pure oxygen and this has its own influence on the phase relations and in crystallization of Y123. Determination of oxygen content of Y123 is critical in its characterization but is altered by procedures used to prepare samples for analysis and by aging of the samples. The Cu L self-absorption spectrum of Y123 shows marked changes with oxygen doping and varies within some samples on a micron-scale.

Download: Event PDF

Special Seminar

Interfacial Behavior of Highly Epitaxial Ferroelectric (Pb,Sr)TiO3 Thin Films

by: Dr. Yuan Lin

Date: Friday August 14, 2009

Time: 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Location: Houston Science Center – Building 593 — Room 102

Overview

(Pb,Sr)TiO3 thin films have shown great potential in high frequency room temperature microwave elements due to their excellent properties such as large tunability and low dielectric loss. Interfacial properties have been considered to be related closely with the dielectric properties of these films. To fully understand the growth mechanism for achieving high quality epitaxial films with optimized physical properties, systematical study on the interfacial behavior is critical and important. We have investigated the strain states, dislocation density and strain distribution near the interface of epitaxial (Pb,Sr)TiO3 thin films on NdGaO3, LaAlO3, and MgO substrates, by using high-resolution X-ray diffraction. Dielectric properties of the films have been measured and demonstrate strong correlation with the interfacial properties such as strain and dislocation densities. Details about the interfacial behavior and strain relaxation will be discussed.

Download: Event PDF

Back to the top of the page

Copyright © 2009 Texas Center for Superconductivity (TcSUH) – 3201 Cullen Suite 202, Houston, Texas 77004 – (713) 743-8200 – Houston Science Center – Buillding 593 – Mail Code: TCSUH 5002

Problems or feedback? Email: