Research At The Texas Center For Superconductivity

Applications Division Statement

Our goal is to make scientific and engineering contributions towards the utilization of HTS thin films and devices in bio-medicine over frequencies ranging from dc to microwave, and to enhance our understanding of high-frequency properties of HTS, dielectric, magnetic, and biological materials.

Our projects require interdisciplinary approaches, and include application research, device/technology development, and fundamental research. The latter includes electromagnetic methods of detecting and studying biological motors, such as the molecular turbine ATP synthase, which produces ATP, the “fuel” used by every part of the human body.

Areas of applied research in biomedicine include early detection of cancer using superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), diagnostic techniques using SQUIDs for cardiology (fetal, neonatal, and adult), HTS radiofrequency (rf) coils for enhanced-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and novel sensors to detect metabolic syndrome in patients suffering from obesity, type-2 diabetes, and heart disease. We also study the surface manifestations of in vivo heat source for diagnostic bio/medical imaging.

  • Study parameters for enhanced critical current density and critical magnetic field of high temperature superconductors with large dimensions at reduced manufacturing cost
  • Energy conversion devices and systems
  • Energy storage devices and systems
  • Biomedical imaging devices and systems
  • Flexible electronic devices and systems

Nano-Science, Materials, Sensors and Systems

The nanoscience group at TCSUH exploits its wide range of material expertise and material characterization and fabrication capabilities acquired over the last two decades in the research and development of superconductivity for the development and processing of nanomaterials with improved performance for biomedicine, composite materials, sensing, energy delivery and storage.

The nanoscience group is a partner in the CONTACT Program which carries out projects and collaborative efforts which address four key areas of interest to the Materials Directorate and other directorates of AFRL. The Program includes the efforts of six other Texas Universities–five campuses of the University of Texas (Austin, Arlington, Dallas, Pan American, and Brownsville), and Rice University. The areas of research are oriented towards Air Force applications in adaptive coatings and surface engineering, nanoenergetics, electromagnetic sensors and power generation, and energy storage.

Biomedical Imaging and Nanomedicine

Our goal is to make scientific and engineering contributions towards the utilization of HTS thin films and devices in bio-medicine over frequencies ranging from dc to microwave, and to enhance our understanding of high-frequency properties of HTS, dielectric, magnetic, and biological materials.

Our projects require interdisciplinary approaches, and include application research, device/technology development, and fundamental research. The latter includes electromagnetic methods of detecting and studying biological motors, such as the molecular turbine ATP synthase, which produces ATP, the “fuel” used by every part of the human body.

Areas of applied research in biomedicine include early detection of cancer using superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs), diagnostic techniques using SQUIDs for cardiology (fetal, neonatal, and adult), HTS radiofrequency (rf) coils for enhanced-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and novel sensors to detect metabolic syndrome in patients suffering from obesity, type-2 diabetes, and heart disease. We also study the surface manifestations of in vivo heat source for diagnostic bio/medical imaging.

Core Participants

HIGH TEMPERATURE SUPERCONDUCTING WIRE FOR ELECTRIC CABLES

Information will be available soon.

FAULT CURRENT LIMITERS FOR TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION HIGH-VOLTAGE CABLES

Information will be available soon.

 

Recent Highlights
New Method Yields Higher Transition Temperature in Superconducting Materials

Researchers from the University of Houston have reported a new way to raise the transition temperature of superconducting

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Recent Highlights

More Information to come.

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